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Sports Medicine & Injuries

Common Podiatry Sports/Active Injuries and Treatments

Delivering effective foot treatments & surgery for sports/active injuries.

Sprains & Tears

Sprains and tears are some of the most frequently occurring injuries for athletes and people that are active. They can cause pain, swelling, and in many cases redness and bruising.

Fractures & Breaks

Foot fractures are common and painful. Typically caused by falls, twisting, or direct impact to the foot or ankle. In most cases made worse by attempting to walk or put weight on the foot.

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is common with runners. Typically, pain is felt in the inside edge of the heel and increased with movement and by added weight to the heel. 

Tendonitis

Foot and ankle pain is typically the first sign of tendonitis, however, the pain is unique because it comes and goes. Tendonitis can affect many of the tendons and ligaments in the foot, heel and ankle.

Heel Spurs

A heel spur is a calcium deposit causing a bony protrusion on the lower heel bone. Heel spurs often occur in athletes participating in sports involving running and jumping.

Athletes Foot

A chronic infection caused by various types of fungus, Athlete’s foot is often spread in places where people go barefoot such as public showers or swimming pools.

Shin Splints

Shin splints are caused by the overuse of muscles that attach to the tibia, which then becomes inflamed. Shin splints are commonly caused by running or excessive exercise.

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Sports Medicine & Injuries Surgery Options

Othering Minimally Invasive Surgery Options

  • Tendinitis – TENEX Procedure (plantar fasciitis)/tendon debridements
  • PRP Injections
  • Ankle Injuries/Sprains – lateral ankle stabilization Ankle injuries (OCDs), and talar dome grafting/repair 
  • Hallux Rigidus (Big Toe Joint Arthritis) – 1st metatarsophalangeal joint replacements (arthrosurface, cartiva implants) 
  • Achilles Tendon – Repairs & tendon transfers, lengthening & shortening procedures 
  • Heel spurs – Release of the plantar fascia & removal of the heel spur
Overview

Fitness and Your Feet

Your feet are one of the most overlooked body parts when it comes to exercise. As you exercise, pay attention to what your feet are telling you. Consult your physician before beginning any fitness program. This includes a complete physical and foot exam. This is especially important for those who are overweight, smoke, or haven’t had a physical exam in a long time. Proper fitness requires wearing the right clothes and shoes. Wear loose-fitting, light-colored and loosely woven clothing in hot weather and several layers of warm clothing in cold weather.

Overview

Fitness and Your Feet

The American Podiatric Medical Association stresses the importance of foot care in exercising. People don’t realize the tremendous pressure that is put on their feet while exercising. For example, a 150-pound jogger puts more than 150 tons of impact on his feet when running three miles. Improper foot care during exercise is a contributing factor to some of the more than 300 foot ailments, according to the APMA. 

The following are common ailments caused by improper foot care during exercise:

  • Athlete’s foot;
  • Blisters;
  • Corns and calluses; and
  • Heel pain (including heel spurs).

 

Leading Fitness Issues with Feet

Baseball is the national pastime in America. From kids to adults, playing baseball is one of the most enjoyable team sports. But as with other sports, its important that you keep yourself in good condition and have the right equipment to play safely and enjoy the health benefits of the game. Baseball players are advised to condition their entire bodies and be sure to stretch the leg, ankle, and foot muscles before, during, and after play to avoid injuries.

Baseball can be characterized by lots of stops and starts, lots of running, and, of course sliding. Practice and technique can enhance your competency and enjoyment of the game, but they are also crucial for building up the muscles needed in baseball. The rapid and changing movements associated with the sport place many pressures on your feet and ankles. Inadequate stretching, improper shoes, and repeated motions lead to the most common foot problems that occur among baseball players, such as Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, shin splints, stress fractures, ankle sprains, and bone fractures.

Baseball Shoes and Cleats

As with most athletic shoes, comfort is the most important element in choosing the right baseball shoe for you. Look for shoes with a roomy toe box that give your toes enough room to wiggle. The widest part of your foot should fit comfortably into the shoe without stretching the upper. Look for a snug heel to help keep your foot stable. Most importantly, remember to replace your baseball shoes after 70 to 75 hours of active wear.

For league play, cleats may be recommended to give you the traction needed for the surface in the diamond. Baseball cleats come in a variety of materials ranging from leather and synthetic materials (plastics) to rubber and metal. Be sure to follow the regulations of your league regarding the material allowed; many leagues no longer permit the use of metal spikes or cleats, particularly on artificial turf. Be sure to give yourself time to adjust to cleats by wearing them on the designated surface.

With all its running, twisting, turning, and jumping, basketball is one of the hardest games on feet. Different movements put all the areas of the foot at risk. That is why proper conditioning, stretching, and well-fitted shoes are critical to a healthy enjoyment of the sport.

Ankle sprain is a particularly common injury in basketball. But the repeated shock and pressures on the foot can also lead to inflammations, including Achilles tendonitisplantar fasciitis, and sesamoiditis.

Basketball Shoes

Foot and ankle stability, shock absorption, and traction are the most important qualities for basketball shoes. If you are susceptible to ankle injuries, consider a high-top or three-quarter shoe that provides added support to key foot structures during play. Look for shoes that offer the following:

  • A wide toe box with plenty of room for your toes to move around. Not enough room can lead to blisters, corns, and calluses.
  • Lightweight, breathable material for uppers; generally, leather is recommended.
  • Dense, abrasion-resistant soles that are low to the ground for better traction and support.
  • A well-cushioned midsole for a shock-absorbing layer. An EVA or EVA-compressed layer is lightweight but not as durable or stable. A polyurethane layer has greater stability, but it is often heavier, too.
  • Bend in the forefoot of the shoe, which is at the ball of the foot near the toes. Be sure there is less bend in the arch where you need the added support to keep the foot stable.
  • A firm heel counter that fits snugly.
  • Laces as the form of closure give you the ability to adjust for the support you need throughout the foot.

When buying basketball shoes, be sure to take the socks you plan to wear with them to ensure a proper fit. Have your feet measured standing up and fit the shoes to your larger foot. Walk around, turn, twist, and jump in each pair on a hard surface to see how your foot feels during each of these movements. Most importantly, make your choice based on comfort.

Since the bicycle’s invention in the early 1900s, it has been a favorite form of recreation and sport in the U.S. More than 100 million Americans enjoy biking, either for recreation or, increasingly, for commuting to work each day. While a great workout for most of the body, feet play a vital role in cycling. They are responsible for the transfer of energy from the body to